It’s Greek to Me

It’s Greek to Me

For this exercise, you will need one person who is in on the trick.  One will be the “Philosopher” and one will be the “Reader.”  Send the reader (your plant) out of the room and decide as a group on a short word.  For example, Love.  The reader comes back in and the philosopher, who has a pointer or wand, spells out the word starting sentences with the consonants and tapping out a code for the vowels with the pointer.  The vowel code is:

A- One tap

E- Two taps

I- Three taps

O-Four taps

U-Five taps

So for our example Love:

Sidecoach: Listen carefully to get the word. (This gives the L)

The sidecoach pretends to write in the air or on the ground.  Taps the pointer four times (This gives O)

Sidecoach: Very carefully watch my pointer (This gives the V)

The sidecoach pretends to write in the air or on the ground.  Taps the pointer twice (This gives the E)

Reader: The word is Love.

Now the rest of the group can try to be readers and discover the trick.

In reverence, talk about how this relates to things we read.  Do we have to decipher it like this?  What do we take out of what we read?  Can scripture, readings, or stories be hard to interpret?

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Scripture, The Sources, Myth.

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