Wisdom Mirror

Wisdom Mirror

To begin this exercise break the group up into pairs.  Give the pairs a topic of conversation that you have decided on.  One person in the pair begins to talk about the topic that you have given.  They are the initiator.  The other person in the pair, the follower, mirrors the words that the first partner exactly out loud.  Their goal is to speak the words that the initiator is saying exactly.  After a short time the sidecoach will say “Change” and the follower will now start to be the initator, picking up where the two just left off.  The first speaker will now become the follower and begin to mirror the words of the new initator.  The goal is to have no break in the flow of the conversation.  For example:

Sidecoach:  Ok the topic is meditation.  First speaker begin!

1st Speaker (initiator): Meditation is something that you can do anytime and anywhere…

2nd Speaker (follower): mirroring speech simultaneously Meditation is something that you can do anytime and anywhere…

After a period of time

Sidecoach: Change!  Try not to stop the flow.

Change the initiator and follower several more times throughout the conversation.

In reverence, talk about what it was like sharing the conversation.  Was it hard to keep the flow?  Did it get easier as you went along?  Did you begin to know what the other person was going to say?  Did you share some wisdom or learn something new?

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: The Sources, Wisdom.  This could work with any theme if you provide it as the topic of conversation.

UUs in Space…

UUs in Space…

This is a basic acting exercise that encourages participants to experience the space around them. To begin tell participants to find their own comfortable position in the space.  They may either sit or lay down, but make sure that they have their eyes open during the exercise.  Closed eyes may mean disconnection from the exercise.  You will guide the participants to be aware by feeling the world around them.  For example:

Sidecoach: Feel ground beneath you (or beneath your feet.)

Feel the ground (chair) on your neck and back.  Where do you touch the ground          (chair?)  Where does the ground (chair) touch you?

Feel your head on the ground.  What does the ground feel like cushioned by your hair? 

                   Feel the air around you.  Is it warm or cool?  Is it humid or dry?

                   Listen to the room.  What do you hear?  Is it loud or quiet?

                   Smell the room.  What does it smell like? 

You can now let participants get up and walk the space.

                   Feel how the ground supports you.  Is it hold you up?

                   Feel the air as you move.  Are you moving it or is it moving you?

                   Feel people as they pass you.  What do you feel as they go by?

In reverence you should talk about what some of the answers were to the questions above or ones that you have added.

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Insight, divinity, mysticism, memory and hope and peace.

To Thine Own Self be Aware

To Thine Own Self be Aware

This is a basic acting exercise that allows the participants to become aware of their own body and feelings.  To begin tell participants to find their own comfortable position in the space.  They may either sit or lay down, but make sure that they have their eyes open during the exercise.  Closed eyes may mean disconnection from the exercise.  You will guide the participants to be aware from the bottom up.  For example:

Sidecoach: Feel your feet inside your socks.

                   Feel your socks on your feet.

                   Feel your feet in your shoes.

                   Feel your legs in your pant legs.

                   Feel your pant legs on your legs.

                   Feel your waist in your pants.  Feel your belt and its tightness.

                   Feel your chest where it touches your shirt.

                   Feel your shirt where it touches your chest.

                   Feel your hair on your head.

                   Try and feel inside your head.

You can go much more in depth than these.

In reverence, talk about what they felt.  Was it different thinking about your socks touching you and you touching your socks?  Did you learn anything about your body today?

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Insight, divinity, mysticism, memory and hope and Peace.

Writing For Three

Writing For Three

For this exercise you will need a piece of paper for each group.  The paper should be divided into three columns with a number 1, 2 or 3 and a word or subject at the top of each column.  Begin by dividing participants in to groups of three.  Then you can explain how the game will work.  The participants will sit in a circle and will always pass the paper to their right.  You can either say “pass” or “switch.”  Practice passing the paper so participants get in the habit of just passing to the right.  Now explain that after you tell them to pass, you will say a number of one of the columns.  When they hear the number they should start writing about the word or topic immediately.  Between the three people, they will all write about the topics.  For example:

Writing for 3

Sidecoach: Ok first person ready.  Two!  Write!  (Wait 45 seconds or so) Ok Switch next person!  One! Write! (Wait 45 seconds or so) Ok Switch next person!  Three!  Write! 

You should continue around at least twice and randomly say the numbers.  At the end you should have paper filled with three different people’s writing on the three subjects.  Have the groups read together what they wrote.

In reverence, talk about what it was like writing in a community.  Did they just write their own or did they try to read and add to what was there?  Was one person’s idea of the topic the same or different?

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Community, scripture, grace, the sources, learning and growth, common ground.  This would be a good exercise for any of the themes.  Just change the topics to fit that theme.

Listening to the World

Listening to the World

This is an exercise to take in and appreciate the wisdom of the world around us.  It also helps participants work on listening skills, a key element in empathetic understanding.

The exercise is very simple.  Have the participants sit for one minute in silence taking in all the sounds in the immediate area.  When the minute is up discuss what sounds people heard and compare from person to person how the sounds were the same or different.

In reverence, discuss what wisdom can come from simply listening to the world around us.  How well do we really listen?  Do we choose not to listen?  Perhaps we could take one minute each day to listen to the world around us.

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Divinity, Peace, Simplicity, and Wisdom.

The Future Machine

The Future Machine. This is game you have probably played before, but with a few tweaks.  The games is basically human machine.  However, for this variation you will need to give each participant a piece of blank paper and a marker.  Explain they will have exactly two minutes to design a fantastical machine that will solve a big problem.  Water shortage, poverty, homelessness, etc.  They will need to choose a problem and then draw a schematic for the future machine.  Tell them to use their imaginations.  I often do this with K-1 kids and they come up with the coolest stuff.  Tell them to think in that realm.  Once the two minutes is up, explain that now they will be the foreman and build this machine out of the people in the room.  You may need to split the participants into groups.  Also explain that each piece must move and make a noise.  The foreman will explain their machine to the group and then build it and start it up.  Try to get through as many people as possible.

Adapted from:

Rohd, Michael. Theatre for Community, Conflict & Dialogue: The Hope Is Vital Training Manual. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1998. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Imagination, Justice, Peace, Preparation, and Vision.