UUs in Space…

UUs in Space…

This is a basic acting exercise that encourages participants to experience the space around them. To begin tell participants to find their own comfortable position in the space.  They may either sit or lay down, but make sure that they have their eyes open during the exercise.  Closed eyes may mean disconnection from the exercise.  You will guide the participants to be aware by feeling the world around them.  For example:

Sidecoach: Feel ground beneath you (or beneath your feet.)

Feel the ground (chair) on your neck and back.  Where do you touch the ground          (chair?)  Where does the ground (chair) touch you?

Feel your head on the ground.  What does the ground feel like cushioned by your hair? 

                   Feel the air around you.  Is it warm or cool?  Is it humid or dry?

                   Listen to the room.  What do you hear?  Is it loud or quiet?

                   Smell the room.  What does it smell like? 

You can now let participants get up and walk the space.

                   Feel how the ground supports you.  Is it hold you up?

                   Feel the air as you move.  Are you moving it or is it moving you?

                   Feel people as they pass you.  What do you feel as they go by?

In reverence you should talk about what some of the answers were to the questions above or ones that you have added.

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Insight, divinity, mysticism, memory and hope and peace.

To Thine Own Self be Aware

To Thine Own Self be Aware

This is a basic acting exercise that allows the participants to become aware of their own body and feelings.  To begin tell participants to find their own comfortable position in the space.  They may either sit or lay down, but make sure that they have their eyes open during the exercise.  Closed eyes may mean disconnection from the exercise.  You will guide the participants to be aware from the bottom up.  For example:

Sidecoach: Feel your feet inside your socks.

                   Feel your socks on your feet.

                   Feel your feet in your shoes.

                   Feel your legs in your pant legs.

                   Feel your pant legs on your legs.

                   Feel your waist in your pants.  Feel your belt and its tightness.

                   Feel your chest where it touches your shirt.

                   Feel your shirt where it touches your chest.

                   Feel your hair on your head.

                   Try and feel inside your head.

You can go much more in depth than these.

In reverence, talk about what they felt.  Was it different thinking about your socks touching you and you touching your socks?  Did you learn anything about your body today?

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Insight, divinity, mysticism, memory and hope and Peace.

The Space Between the Stars

The Space Between the Stars

To begin this exercise split the group in half.  One half will do the exercise and the other half will be the watchers alternately.  With the first group, explain that they will start by individually putting their hands about 2 inches apart and move them together around the space.  Their hands can go anywhere, as long as they stay about 2 inches apart.  Tell the watchers to focus on the space between the hands.  Once they have done this for a few minutes switch groups and let the watchers do the exercise.

Next switch back to the first group and have pairs of people put their hands about 2 inches apart and do the exercise together.  Again remind the watchers to see the space between the hands.  Let the second group do the same after a few minutes.

You can build up however you would like, but the goal should be that at the end of the exercise, the entire group should be doing the movement together.  Make sure that they keep their hands about 2 inches apart.  This will become more complicated as more people are working together.

In reverence, talk about what it was like keeping the distance, but moving together.  Was it hard to keep the space?  What did the watchers see in the space between?  What did the participants feel in the space?

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Common Ground, Divinity, Mysticism, Grace, Community, and Covenant.

Touch and be Touched, See and be Seen

Touch and be Touched, See and be Seen

The purpose of this game is for participants to fully engage themselves in the community around them.  You will need to bring some objects to the session for this exercise.  You can bring items that relate to your theme, items specific to Universal Unitarianism (ie. A chalice,) or just every-day objects.  To begin, define a space in the room you are working in for the participants to use and set the objects out randomly in the space.  You will tell the participants that they will be walking the space and trying to truly feel and see the things around them.  This means not only the items that you have brought, but the space itself and everything in it.  Tell them to begin walking the space.  After a few moments of just walking have them stop and touch an item.  For example:

Sidecoach:  Ok, now pause and touch the nearest item.  As you touch it and begin to feel it against your skin, know that it is touching you.  Let it touch and feel you the way you feel it.

You can do this with several items.  On each item give participants a minute or so to try and feel each item.  After a few items, the participants will touch another person.  For younger people, it might be necessary to say something about only touching on the hand and appropriately.  However, in general they can touch anywhere that is respectful.  For example:

Sidecoach: Ok now pause and touch someone standing near you.  Allow the person to touch you too.

You can do this several times and with several different people.  Now you will repeat the process with seeing.  Begin again with items, reminding participants to let the item see them as well.  Then you can tell participants to look at another person and see them while letting them see you.

In reverence, talk about what it was like feeling something and what that was like.  What was it like touching a person and letting them touch you?  What was it like trying to truly see an object?  What about a person?  Was it hard to look at a person and trying to see them?

 

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Community, Ultimacy, Mysticism, Vision, Truth, Common Ground, and Insight.