I’d Buy That!

I’d Buy That!

In this game groups of participants will work together to advertise for an imaginary product.  To begin, break the participants up into groups of 3 to 5.  One group will make the advertisement at a time, the other participants can be observers.  Get a suggestion from the observers or have an idea prepared.  For example a peace maker, a never empty water well, etc.

Tell them they are the creative team and need to inform the public about all that it can do.  Encourage participants to build on the last thing that was said by using the phrase “Yes and…”  For example:

Sidecoach: You are the creative team of advertisers for the peace maker.  Tell us all about what it can do!

Person 1: Well our peace maker allows people to see similarities between themselves and others.

Person 2: Yes and it has a built in mediator when there is a disagreement.

Person 3: It can find land for everyone to live on.

Sidecoach: Say “Yes and…”

Person 4: Yes and it can find land for everyone to live one.

In reverence, talk about what they were selling and how it would help.  If this thing existed would it help or hurt?  Would it use resources well?  What was it like adding to someone else’s ideas?  Did it make the product better?

Adapted from:

McKnight, Katherine S., and Mary Scruggs. The Second City Guide to Improv in the Classroom: Using Improvisation to Teach Skills and Boost Learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Economy, Vocation, Common Ground, Creativity, Imagination, and Grace.

Getting and Giving

Getting and Giving

To begin this exercise make sure the participants have a specific space that they can walk freely in.  That is define the boundaries of their space.  If there are lots of participants, divide the group into smaller groups of about 8-10.

Have participants walk the space freely.  Call out “Freeze” and “Unfreeze” to get participants used to getting still.  After several times, call out “Freeze” and explain that you will unfreeze one participant at a time to walk the space.  Unfreeze one person and let them walk around for a few moments before re-freezing them and unfreezing another participant.  Make sure everyone has the chance to walk the space alone with others frozen.

When the final person has been re-frozen, explain that they, not you, will give the signal to move.  They will do this without speaking or touching.  Only one person may move at a time.  Let them do this until everyone has moved once.

In reverence, talk about what it was like giving and taking movement.  How did it feel to give someone movement and know they were taking yours?  Was it hard to give away?  Was it worth it?

Adapted from:

McKnight, Katherine S., and Mary Scruggs. The Second City Guide to Improv in the Classroom: Using Improvisation to Teach Skills and Boost Learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Generosity, Liberation, Freedom, and Hospitality.

Tell the Truth!

Tell the Truth!

This is an improvisation based exercise.  It is good for beginners, and only needs to last a few minutes.  This exercise will be done in pairs.  When a pair is doing the exercise the other participants will be observers.  To begin the exercise get from the observers or have prepared characters, a place, and an activity.

Let participants begin the scene.  At moments you feel appropriate, shout out “Tell the truth!”  The person that just said a line must change to something new without hesitation.  Do this several times for both participants.

In reverence, talk about what the truth was or is.  What was more truthful, what you said first or your other options?  Was it hard to remember what “truth” you told?

Adapted from:

McKnight, Katherine S., and Mary Scruggs. The Second City Guide to Improv in the Classroom: Using Improvisation to Teach Skills and Boost Learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Truth, evil, insight, change, and Memory and Hope.

Steered Story

Steered Story

To begin this exercise divide the participants into groups of 5 to 8.  One group will go at a time with the others being observers.  Members of the group should stand in a semi-circle facing the sidecoach and observers.  Make sure it isn’t a line, but a semi-circle.  This allows the participants to see and listen to one another better.

The side coach will ask for or provide a topic for the story.  Once the topic is chosen, the sidecoach will sit on the floor in front of the semi-circle.  The sidecoach will point to one person who will start the story.  When that person has told a portion of the story, the sidecoach will signal that person to stop while pointing to another person in the line.  That person will pick up the story without hesitating, even if it was in the middle of a sentence or word.  Go through until each person has gone about twice.

In reverence, talk about what it was like making the story.  Was it a good story?  Did it have a beginning, middle and end?  How did the story change or stay the same between people?

Adapted from:

McKnight, Katherine S., and Mary Scruggs. The Second City Guide to Improv in the Classroom: Using Improvisation to Teach Skills and Boost Learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Myth, the sources, Creativity, Imagination, and scripture.

It’s In the Cards

 It’s In the Cards

To begin this exercise divide the participants into groups of about 8 to 15 people.  Give each participant a random playing card.  Tell the participants to think of a type of person or character that would match the status of card’s place in the deck.  For example, if a person has a King they might think of a powerful politician or a rich celebrity.  If the person has a two, they might think of someone in poverty living on the street or someone shy and awkward.  Explain that the participants will mingle in character for a few minutes.  Remind them that they are not to tell who they are, but rather show it. Tell them to think about how the status of the character makes them move, walk, talk, even breath.

After a several minutes of mingling ask the participants to line up from lowest in the deck to highest.

In reverence, talk about what it was like exploring status.  Were they able to arrange themselves correctly at the end? What was it like to be low in status?  High in status?  How did people of differing status interact?

Adapted from:

McKnight, Katherine S., and Mary Scruggs. The Second City Guide to Improv in the Classroom: Using Improvisation to Teach Skills and Boost Learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Wisdom, Evil, Salvation, truth, Brokenness, Economy, and insight.