I’d Buy That!

I’d Buy That!

In this game groups of participants will work together to advertise for an imaginary product.  To begin, break the participants up into groups of 3 to 5.  One group will make the advertisement at a time, the other participants can be observers.  Get a suggestion from the observers or have an idea prepared.  For example a peace maker, a never empty water well, etc.

Tell them they are the creative team and need to inform the public about all that it can do.  Encourage participants to build on the last thing that was said by using the phrase “Yes and…”  For example:

Sidecoach: You are the creative team of advertisers for the peace maker.  Tell us all about what it can do!

Person 1: Well our peace maker allows people to see similarities between themselves and others.

Person 2: Yes and it has a built in mediator when there is a disagreement.

Person 3: It can find land for everyone to live on.

Sidecoach: Say “Yes and…”

Person 4: Yes and it can find land for everyone to live one.

In reverence, talk about what they were selling and how it would help.  If this thing existed would it help or hurt?  Would it use resources well?  What was it like adding to someone else’s ideas?  Did it make the product better?

Adapted from:

McKnight, Katherine S., and Mary Scruggs. The Second City Guide to Improv in the Classroom: Using Improvisation to Teach Skills and Boost Learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Economy, Vocation, Common Ground, Creativity, Imagination, and Grace.

Who Started the Movement?

Who Started the Movement?

To begin this exercise get all participants in a circle.  Send one person out of the room who will be the seeker.  Once the seeker is gone, choose one person to be the leader who will start the motion.  Call the seeker back in and put them in the center of the circle where they will try to discover the leader who is leading the other people in the circle to do different motions.  Everyone in the circle follows the leader.  The leader may change the movement as much as they like.  When the seeker figures out who the leader is, the seeker may choose a new seeker.  When the new seeker leaves the room the leader may choose a new leader.

In reverence, talk about what it was like trying to find the leader or be the leader.  What was it like to have the job of leading everyone?  Was it easier to follow?  How did you find the leader?  Was that a hard job?

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Vocation and justice

Also a great warm up.

One Part in a Whole

One Part in a Whole

In this exercise participants will work as whole to do a group activity.  To begin separate participants into groups of 5 to 10.  Participants choose one person to be the leader.  The leader will secretly choose a group activity and begin doing an activity that relates.  As the participants realize what the activity they join in doing a part of it.  For example, if the activity is building a house, the leader starts by miming cutting wood.  The next player hammers nails, the next puts up a door, etc. Tell participants to focus more on the movement and not using dialogue.

In reverence, talk about what it was like working as a whole.  How was it like the covenant in class?  Did everyone think it was the same activity?

Adapted from:

Spolin, Viola. Theater Games for the Classroom: A Teacher’s Handbook. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1986. Print.

 

Great for the themes of: Covenant, common ground, vocation, community, Hospitality.

A Young UU

The Ministers Cat/A Young UU

This is an alphabet based rhythm game to get participants thinking about inspiring adjectives for a young UU. To begin this game you will want to split the larger group into smaller groups of about 5-10.  Now teach the rhythm for the game.  At a fairly slow tempo, pat your legs then clap.  The rhythm is:

Pat, clap, pat, clap, pat, clap, and so on.

I like to keep doing the rhythm as I explain the rest of the game.  You can just stop if you would like once you think they have the rhythm.  Explain that they will always use the words:

A Young (pat on young) UU is ______ (Pat on the word in the blank.)

Practice this a few times.

Now explain that they will be using each letter of the alphabet to create a word in the blank.  Then the next person in the circle will use the next letter of the alphabet to create their adjective.  For example:

1st person: A Young UU is Awesome

2nd person: A Young UU is Bold

3rd person: A Young UU is Caring

And so on.  “Ex” words can be used for “X.”  When you get to “Z” start at the beginning of the alphabet once again.

If the rhythm gets in the way of the words drop it.  It is much more important that the words are said.

 

Great for the themes of: Change, Common Ground, Community, Preparation, and Vocation.